News and Updates - 2019

 

two-person exhibition - Exurban with Jason Brown
Alexander Brest Gallery, Jacksonville University, Jacksonville, Florida 

February 2020

group exhibition - Land Report Collective
New Harmony Gallery of Contemporary Art, New Harmony, Indiana
October 12 - November 22, 2019

group exhibition - ENID: Generations of Women Sculptors Exhibit
Louisville Free Public Library, Bernheim Gallery, Louisville, Kentucky
August 17 -October 8, 2019

group exhibition - ENID: Generations of Women Sculptors Exhibit
McGrath Gallery, Bellarmine University, , Louisville, Kentucky
September 7-October 5, 2019

public art installation - Amplitude III, 2019
Performing Arts Center, Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi
Site-specific indoor ceiling installation May 2019-June 2020

group exhibition - Confluence: TAMU-CC Art Faculty Biennial 2019
Art Museum of South Texas, Corpus Christi, Texas
April 19 - August 11, 2019

juried exhibition - Contemporary Curator’s Juried Exhibition
National Conference on Contemporary Cast Iron Art & Practices, Birmingham, Alabama
juried by Carrie Johnson, Curator, Rockford Art Museum, Illinois
April 3-6, 2019

juried exhibition - Practitioner’s Juried Exhibition
National Conference on Contemporary Cast Iron Art & Practices, Birmingham, Alabama

juried by Tobias Flores, Associate Professor of Sculpture, Fort Hays State University, Kansas
April 3-6, 2019


group exhibition - Interwoven
21C Museum Hotel, Louisville, Kentucky

March 20 - October 6, 2019
Reception, March 31, 4-6pm

In 2019-20, cultural and civic organizations throughout Louisville will be honoring the contributions of female artists to the community through participation in Enid Yandell: A Life of Art and Activism, a series of exhibitions and programs celebrating the 150th anniversary of the birth of Enid Yandell, the first female sculptor from Kentucky to achieve international success and one of the first women inducted into the National Sculpture Society.

In 1998, ten artists based in Louisville founded ENID: Generations of Women Sculptors, a collective of female sculptors named for Enid Yandell, with the goal to encourage, educate, and mentor women artists, students, and each other. Recognizing Enid Yandell’s artistic achievements and her legacy of social activism, Interwoven highlights works by ENID member artists Leticia Bajuyo, Linda Erzinger, Valerie Sullivan Fuchs, Bette Levy, and Joyce Ogden that reflect or respond to social issues through material and visual creativity.

About 21C Museum Hotel
21c Museum Hotel was founded by preservationists and contemporary art collectors Laura Lee Brown and Steve Wilson. The couple wanted to take an active role in the preservation and revitalization of downtown Louisville motivated by changes happening in and around their hometown.
With the belief that art can be a vital part of daily life and a spark to ignite new energy and ideas, they created 21c Museum Hotel in Louisville. Their innovative idea developed into a center for culture, community, genuine hospitality, and artistic expression.


group exhibition - Land Report Collective: West 1
Islander Gallery, Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi, Texas
February 28 - April 14, 2019
Opening reception: Friday, February 28, 5:00-7:00pm at the Islander Gallery
5pm Panel Discussion
6pm Performance

Land Report Collective: West 1
This group of six artists in Wyoming, Tennessee, and Texas create and exhibit artworks together as they deal with landscape in fundamental ways and as a foundational reference point. 



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YoungArts Miami 2019, National YoungArts Foundation, Miami, Florida

I am honored I was able to be part of the YOUNGARTS MIAMI 2019 Lead Faculty & Creative Team! YoungArts is a wonderful foundation and I am grateful to be a part of the 2019 team that got to work with and witness the commitment, hard work, and layers of story and expression by these selected high school students. The impact of the National YoungArts foundation is evident. 

The National YoungArts Foundation (YoungArts) was established in 1981 by Lin and Ted Arison to identify and nurture the most accomplished young artists in the visual, literary, design and performing arts, and assist them at critical junctures in their educational and professional development. Through a wide range of annual programs, performances, and partnerships with some of the nation’s leading cultural institutions, YoungArts aspires to create a strong community of alumni and a platform for a lifetime of encouragement, opportunity and support.


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Conference Panel Session: Land Art Reconsidered: land use, water rights, and indigenous sovereignty
College Art Association 2019 Annual Conference, New York City, New York

Co-Chairs: Leticia R. Bajuyo - Texas A&M University Corpus Christi and Jason S. Brown - University of Tennessee Knoxville
Friday, February 15, 10:30 am - 12:00 pm, at the Hilton Midtown 2nd floor Gramercy East

Land Art or Earthworks gained attention in the 1960s and 1970s as artists used the natural landscape to create site-specific structures, art forms, and sculptures. In many respects, this work borrowed heavily from ancient cultures and civilizations that created art on a monumental scale in the landscape. Contemporary artists who work in the landscape often extend their interventions and investigations beyond formal aesthetic elements to include conceptual, historical and contextual references. What are the challenges and opportunities facing artists working in the field today who are following in the footsteps of Land Art from earlier time periods?

This panel will highlight the work and research of artists, activists, critics and curators who are engaged in practices that explore land use, water rights and issues of indigenous sovereignty. We are interested in how this dialogue can transcend borders that typically reinforce nationalism and privatization. Indigenous artists are creating very innovative work in response to landscape through a process of truth and reconciliation – can a post-colonial critique effectively challenge globalization through Land Art? How might artists work with local communities to resist socio-economic systems that favor private property? Do forms of social practice and creative place making offer new models for civic engagement to transform public property and the commons? As issues of water rights become more critical to the conversation, how are the fields of environmental and ecological art merging with Land Art?

Panelists:
Dr. Anya Montiel, Assistant Professor, University of Arizona, “From the Center of the Earth: The Land Art of the Pueblo Artist Nora Naranjo-Morse“
Alexis Elton, independent artist, farmer and educator, “Expressions of the Land“
Audrey Molloy, independent art critic, educator, and writer, “(De)Centralized Public Space“
Chris Taylor, Associate Professor of Architecture at Texas Tech University and director of Land Arts of the American West, “Pedagogy of Weather: Learning with Earthworks, Duration and Difference”


public art -Shiny Entropy 
LaPalmera Mall in Corpus Christi, Texas
On display beginning June 2018

Thanks to a collaboration between KSpace Contemporary and LaPalmera Mall in Corpus Christi, Texas, my artworks Shiny Entropy: Vortex and Rectangles were selected to be two of the first five public art installations at the LaPalmera Mall. The selection of artists was done by the staff at K Space Contemporary in partnership with the LaPalmera Mall.

June 21 and 22, 2018 were installation days for Shiny Entropy pieces at the LaPalmera Mall in Corpus Christi, Texas. Thanks to the mall team especially Danielle, Bill, and Robert, both installations went well and by noon on June 22, both sites were audience and mall walker ready! 

Shiny Entropy: Vortex
7ft x 7ft x 4ft

Shiny Entropy: Rectangles
six panels each 7ft x 3.5ft x 1in

Glasstire article, K Space Contemporary at La Palmera, by Hannah Dean, July 7, 2018
“...sprawling malls, like any other profit-driven commercial space, are hyper-political spaces. And of course the indoor malls are becoming the ruins left behind by a growing online-economy.“

“The most visually compelling of the works, Leticia R. Bajuyo’s Shiny Entropy, which is a vortex of CDs, reads like a black hole of outdated personal information, from computer backups to wedding videos to mix tapes. If you read the recent articles about Facebook and Google’s data on you, and how it never really goes away, Bajuyo’s archaic tide of technology could be the kind of physical manifestation of this notion that makes you shit your britches.”


14th Annual Sculpture Garden Exhibit
Kemp Center For The Arts, Wichita Falls, Texas

May 10, 2018 - May 9, 2019  

I am honored that Gaze-bo(ught) was selected to be one of the ten outdoor sculptures which will be installed for this year-long exhibition of Art On The Green Sculpture Garden at the Kemp Center for the Arts.  

Gaze-bo(ught) is a gazebo in a gazebo in a gazebo.  Each gazebo form is shaped like a gem and painted a saturated pink.  The roof is made of pink resin panels that become a rose colored lens that when underneath, one is then bathed in pink light. The interior of the sculpture is covered in thick artificial grass, which is always the perfect green and never needs to be mowed.   


Pop Goes the Weasel, 2017
Franconia Sculpture Park, Minnesota
2017 Open Studio Fellowship and Residency
Materials: Chain-link fencing, chain, steel, hardware, and paint.
Dimensions: 6ft 6in H x 12ft W x 12 ft D

A brief statement about Pop Goes the Weasel, 2017:

In my artwork, I utilize recognizable and seemingly neutral commonplace objects that invite audiences to name, compare, and participate in theatrical re-arbitrations of value.  Reminiscent of a Jack-in-the-box toy, the turnstile in the center appears to be winding up the chains and thus adding tension to the fence.  The fence, in turn, attempts to fulfill its role in maintaining boundaries and restricting movement; but the impasse between fence and turnstile results in a distorted stasis that suggests the unsustainability of the tense situation.

By using chain-link fencing, the audience is placed outside this small yard and can witness the effect of the turnstile on the fence.  Can a Jack-in-the-box go backwards?  Can the box be removed? How can this tug-of-war be resolved?

Crank, crank, crank
Turn, turn, turn
Just a little more
Watch and discern.

 

For more information about Franconia's fellowships and deadlines, visit http://www.franconia.org/ArtistOpportunities.html