CD Walls: doubles

Shipshape, 2015
Installed a the From Waste to Art Museum, Baku, Azerbaijan
Donated CD and DVD discs, Monofilament, Cable ties, Cable, wood, and hardware
Dimensions: 8 feet H x 8 feet W x 12 feet L

I was invited to participate in the IV International Exhibition From Waste to Art, June 2015. This artist Residency and group exhibition at the From Waste to Art Museum was organized by Tamiz Shahar JSC, Baku, Azerbaijan.  This year, 23 artists from 17 different countries participated.

Tamiz Shahar is a state organization providing waste disposal services to Baku, the capital of Azerbaijan. The objective of the company is to establish up to date and sustainable waste management system in Baku and bring the latest novelties in the waste management sphere to the country through sharing experience with foreign countries and international companies. This includes a number of activities to increase public awareness on waste problems and stimulate people to protect the environment through proper waste treatment. This annual art exhibition is one of the ways in which they are achieving this goal.

Shipshape - in good order, trim and neat
The shape of this installation was inspired by ships on the Caspian Sea in combination with the optimistic attitude inherent in and the never-ending work of resource reuse and recycling.  Titled Shipshape, this sculptural ship, whose hull is made of discarded digital memory in the CD's and DVDs, is both rising and sinking into the floor.  From the bow, the waste appears perpetual and unending; while from the stern, the ship becomes a viewfinder for looking beyond and through the waste.

 

Event Horizon, 2012
Installed at the Women and Their Work Gallery, Austin, Texas.
Donated CD and DVD discs, Monofilament, Cable ties, Ratchet tie down straps, Bungee cords, Irrigation tubing, Eye bolts and eye screws, Sheet metal and wood screws, Fender washers, Threaded metal rods and bolts, 2x4s and plywood, Black paint, Theremin, and Speakers with amplifiers
Dimensions: 10 feet H x 25 feet W x 30 feet L

An austinaut plays theremin at the opening night of Leticia Bajuyo's installation, Event Horizon. Women and their Work | Austin, TX | June 30, 2012

An "event horizon" or point of no return on the edge of a black hole is a phrase common to science fiction books, tv shows, and movies.  The two curved vortex walls, built of whim, desire, and purchasing trends, transforms yesterday’s media hits and today’s detritus into a disco vortex, a material and technological Event Horizon.

Event Horizon was a solo-exhibition at the Women and Their Work gallery in Austin, Texas.  This exhibtion was made possible in part through support from the Visual Artists Network Exhibition residency, which is a program of the National Performance Network. Major contributors are the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, the Joan Mitchell Foundation, the Ford Foundation and the Nathan Cummings Foundation.  

Photos by Rino Pizzi

 

Event Horizon, 2012

Installed in Gallery H100, Eastfield College, Dallas, Texas

Donated CD and DVD discs, Monofilament, Cable ties, Ratchet tie down straps, Bungee cords, Irrigation tubing, Eye bolts and eye screws, Sheet metal and wood screws, Fender washers, Threaded metal rods and bolts, 2x4s and plywood, Black paint, Theremin, and Speakers with amplifiers

Event Horizon was redesigned for the new exhibition space H100 at Eastfield College in Dallas, Texas.  In collaboration with the "Austinauts," the two musicians Marcosis and Fluri wrote 30-minute pieces that was performed on/in the sculpture at the opening reception on Saturday, September 22nd, 2012.

Photos by Rino Pizzi